1895, Complementary Convention on Commerce - France

pdficon_large.gif

COMPLEMENTARY CONVENTION TO THE SUPPLEMENTARY
CONVENTION OF JUNE 26, 1887 BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

(Signed at Beijing, June 20, 1895)

            The President of the French Republic and His Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to improve and extend the development of commercial relations between the two countries on the Sino-Annamese frontier, now delimited as far as the Mekong, and to assure the proper execution of the Treaty of Commerce signed at Tianjin on April 25, 1886, and of the Additional Convention, signed at Beijing on June 26, 1887 have decided to conclude a Complementary Convention, embodying further new arrangements and modifying some of the arrangements included in the aforesaid Actes.

            Top this end, the two High Contractin Parties have named as their respective Plenipotentiaries, namely:

            The President of the French Republic, M. Auguste Gérard, Minister Plenipotentiary, Envoy Extraordinary of the Republic of France in China, Officer of the Legion of Honor, Grand Cross of the Order of Indepence of Montenegro, Grand Officer of the Order of Charles III of Spain, Grand Officer of the Royal Order of the Italian Crown, etc., etc.;

            And His Majesty the Emperor of China, His Highness Prince Qing, Prince of the first degree, President of the Tsungli Yamen, etc., etc.,

            And His Excellence Siu Yongyi, Member of the Tsungli Yamen and of the Imperial Grand Council, Vice-President of the Left of the Ministry of the Interior, etc., etc.;

            They, after having communicated their full powers, which were found to be in good and due form, have agreed to the following Articles:—

Article I.

            It is agreed, in order to assure the policing of the frontier, that the French Government will have the right to keep a Consular Agent at Tong-hing, across from Moncay, on the Guangdong border.

            A later regulation will determine the conditions under which policing of the common frontier of China-Annam will be exercised, by agreement between the French and Chinese authorities.

Article II.

            Article II of the Additional Convention, signed at Beijing on June 26, 1887, is modified and supplemented as follows:

            It is agreed between the High Contracting Parties that the town of Long-tcheou, in Guangxi, and that of Mong-tse, in Yunnan, will be open to French-Annamese commerce. Further, it is understood that the point open to commerce on the river route from Lao-kai to Mong-tse, will no longer be Man-hao, but Ho-k’eou, and that the French Government will have the right to keep an Agent of the Consul of Mong-tse at Ho-k’eou, while at the same time the Chinese Government may keep a Customs agent there.

Article III.

            It is agreed that the town of Sse-mao, in Yunnan, will be opened to French-Annamese commerce, as are Long-tcheou and Mong-tse, and that the French Government will have the right, as at other open ports, to keep a Consul there, and at the same time that the Chinese Government may keep a Customs agent  there.

            The local authorities will exert  itself to see that the French Consul is honorably housed.

            Frenchmen and French protégés may settle at Sse-mao, under conditions set forth by Articles VII, X, XI, XII and others in the Treaty of June 27, 1858, as well as by Article III of the Convention of April 25, 1886. Goods destined for China may be transported by river, notably by the Lo-so and Meong, as well as by land routes, and notably by the mandarin road from Mong-lé or from I-pang to Sse-mao and P’ou-eul, the duties on these goods being paid at Sse-mao.

Article IV.

            Article IX of the Commercial Convention of April 25, 1886 is modified as follows:

            1. Chinese merchandise, moving from one to another of the four towns open to commerce on the frontier—Long-tcheou, Mong-tse, Sse-mao and Ho-k’eou—in passing through Annam, will pay, on leaving Annam, a duty reduced by four-tenths. It will be issued a special certificate noting payment of this duty and which is to accompany the merchandise. When it has arrived in the other town, it will be exempted from import duty.

            2. Chinese merchandise which will be exported from the four abovenamed places and sent to Chinese maritime or river ports open to trade will pay, upon its exit across the border, export duty reduced by four-tenths. It will be issued a special certificate noting payment of this duty and which is to accompany the merchandise. When it has arrived at  a maritime or river port open to trade it will pay a half-duty for reimportation, in conformance with the general rule for all similar merchandise in maritime or river ports open to trade.

            3. Chinese merchandise which is sent from Chinese maritime or river ports open to commerce and which passes through Annam for the four localities designated above will pay, upon exiting, the full duty. It will be issued a special certificate noting the payment of the duty and which is to accompany the merchandise. When it arrives at the frontier customs house it will pay, upon entry, a half-duty of reimportation, based on the four-tenths reduction.

            4. The abovementioned Chinese goods, which are accompanied by the aforesaid special certificates, will, before passing through export customs or after passing reimport customs, fall under the rules governing native Chines merchandise.

Article V.

            It is understood that China will, for the development of mines in the provinces of Yunnan, Guangxi and Guangdong, first turn to French industrialists and engineers, although the development, in other respects, will fall under the regulations decreed by the Imperial Government pertaining to national industry.

            It is agreed that railways in Annam, either existing or planned, will, after consultation and under defined conditions, be extended into Chinese territory.

Article VI.

            Article II of the Telegraphic Convention between France and China, signed at Chefoo on December 1, 1888, is completed as follows:

            D. A link-up will be established between the Secondary Prefecture of Sse-mao and Annam through two stations, which will be at Sse-mao in China and Muong-ha-hin (Muong-ngay-neua), located in Annam halfway between Lai-chau and Luang-Prabang.

            Tariffs will be set according to Article Vi of the Telegraphic convention of Chefoo.

Article VII.

            It is agreed that the trade stipulations contained in the present Convention are of a special nature and the reslu of mutual concessions, determined by the needs of the relations between Long-tcheou, Ho-k’eou, Mong-tse, Sse-mao and Annam, the resulting advantages not to be invoked by the subjects and protégés of the two High Contracting Parties, other than at the places and on the river and land routes on the frontier as determined herein.

Article VIII.

            The present stipulations will enter into force as if they had been inserted directly into the text of the Additional Convention of June 26, 1887.

Article IX.

            Those arrangements of the old Treaties, Accords and Conventions between France and China not modified by the present Treaty remain in full force.

            The present Complementary Convention will be ratified at once by His Majesty the Emperor of China and, after having been ratified by the President of the French Republic, the exchange of ratifications shall take place in Beijing with the least possible delay.

            Done at Beijing, in four copies, June 20, 1895, corresponding to the 28th day of the 5th month of the 21st year of Guang Xu.

[L.S.]           (Signed)          A. GÉRARD.

QING.

SIU.